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Latest circular from CMS

Tuesday, 16 April 2013 16:05

Latest circular from CMS

Please click on link below to view the latest circular from CMS

Discovery IBM amalgamation (78.47 kB)

 

Success of the ESR 2013

Tuesday, 09 April 2013 12:11

Dear Member,

The European Society of Radiology (ESR) would like to thank the
Radiological Society of South Africa for its contribution to another successful ECR.

Out of a total of 20,098 ECR 2013 participants,

Please click on link below to view more detail.

Success of ECR 2013 (1) (342.85 kB)

 

What is Troubling South Africa's Healthcare System?

Friday, 05 April 2013 11:16

The Council for Medical Schemes (CMS) has produced an excellent compilation of views on South Africa's Healthcare system and the proposal for NHI, This is a collection of numerous short articles from just about everyone involved in healthcare. Highly recommended read. Click on the link below to download the document:

CMS News March 2013 (3.7 MB)

 

Thank you for the success of ECR 2013

Tuesday, 26 March 2013 10:21

The European Society of Radiology (ESR) would like to thank the
Radiological Society of South Africa for its contribution to another successful ECR.

Out of a total of 20,098 ECR 2013 participants, 40 were professional delegates from South Africa, compared with 22 at ECR 2012. To view the entire list of participation figures by country, please click here.
The ESR looks forward to welcoming your society again at ECR 2014 and attracting a growing number of professionals from your country to join the ESR community.

Success of ECR 2013 (342.85 kB)

With best regards,
the ESR Office

 

HPCSA Media Release - HPCSA concerned over potential exploitation

Tuesday, 26 March 2013 09:09

Dear Members,

Attached and underneath, please find a media release on potential exploitation of healthcare practitioners entering into Designated Service Provider and Preferred Provider Network contracts with medical aids, for your consideration.

Please do not hesitate to contact me should you require any further information.

HPCSA Media Release - Concerns ove exploitation of healthcare practitioners (87 kB)

 

RSSA Cone Beam CT Workshop

Tuesday, 26 March 2013 09:00

Dear Members,

Please note that the RSSA CBCT Workshop which will be held on 1 June 2013 in Cape Town is now active on site.

Click on the links below to view flyer and for further information.

Flyer: RSSA Cone Beam CT Worshop (856.27 kB)

 

RSSA Guidelines on Contingency fees

Wednesday, 20 March 2013 09:04

Dear Members,

Please see the link below to see the RSSA guidlines on contingency fees.

20130228 RSSA Policy Statement on Contingency Fees - Feb 2013 (285.3 kB)

 

South African Radiology demonstrates its dynamism and vibrancy on the big stage

Monday, 11 March 2013 11:59

Dear Members,

please click on link below to view the article on the South African Radiology.

South African Radiological Article (179.69 kB)

 

ESR Meets South Africa March 9, 2013 - ECR Vienna, Austria

Tuesday, 26 February 2013 09:39

ESR meets South Africa: March 9, 2013: 10:25-12h00 : ECR, Vienna - Austria.

As mentioned in recent correspondence The Radiological Society of South Africa (RSSA) will be a guest of honour at ECR 2013 (7-11 March 2013 , Vienna). In a dedicated session that will begin a new area of collaboration between African and European radiologists, the RSSA’s delegation will focus on two of the biggest health issues in South Africa : HIV and tuberculosis.

Please view the link below or continue reading for further information on the schedule of RSSA speaker sessions:

http://ipp.netkey.at/esr/ecr2013/index.php?p=recorddetail&rid=557e7f5c281f4bc5560fa8706ca36c41#pres89ca57e6877559b3e12feaced834e0b1

EM 3 - Imaging HIV and TB

Saturday, March 9, 10:25 - 12:00 / Room B
Session Type: ESR meets South Africa
CME: 1.50
Topic: General Radiology
Moderators: J. I. Bilbao(Pamplona/ES), G. P. Krestin(Rotterdam/NL), C. Sperryn(Cape Town/ZA)

8 presentations in this session:

» A-256 - Introduction

» A-257 - HIV-related cerebrovascular disease: the South African experience

» A-258 - Interlude: Radiology training in South Africa

» A-259 - New concepts in the pathogenesis of cerebral TB

» A-260 - Interlude: South Africa: the country, its people, its diversity and its attractions

» A-261 - Spinal tuberculosis in children

» A-262 - Chronic chest radiographic changes in a cohort of HIV-infected South African children

» Panel discussion: HIV and TB: What impact do they have on health care workers?


A-256

Introduction

10:30

C. Sperryn; Cape Town/ZA

In South Africa, HIV infection is a high risk factor for stroke in young patients. Prof Victor Mngomezulu will present HIV-related Cerebrovascular Disease: The South African experience. A systematic review of published literature from three major South African academic centres in the last 12 years. The concept of the Rich focus as the cause of tuberculous meningitis is controversial. Using original images from Arnold Rich’s work, as well as that of the South African physician JN Coetzee’s thesis on tuberculous meningitis, Dr Pieter Janse van Rensburg will illustrate why there is doubt as to the role of the Rich focus as the cause of basal cisternal tuberculous meningitis and propose a more likely pathogenetic mechanism based on radiological-pathological correlations using MR imaging. The incidence of tuberculosis (TB) is increasing in both developing and developed world, and is complicated by the emergence of multi-drug resistant disease and co-infection with HIV. Dr Tracy Kilborn will cover the varied presentations of TB in the spine and discuss the MRI features. South Africa has the highest global HIV prevalence, estimated at 5.6 million people, including 377,000 children. Prof Richard Pitcher describes the 5-year findings of a Cape Town-based US-UCT collaborative paediatric pulmonology HIV-research group focussing on severe CXR abnormalities in HIV infected children. The two interludes will be presented by Prof Zarina Lockhat. The first will cover radiology training in South Africa. The final interlude will be a celebration of SOUTH AFRICA: the country, its people, its diversity, and its attractions.


A-257

HIV-related cerebrovascular disease: the South African experience

10:35

V. Mngomezulu; Johannesburg/ZA

The purpose of this lecture is to describe the South African experience in HIV-related cerebrovascular disease. A systematic review of published literature from the three major South African academic centres in the last 12 years was conducted in order to catalogue their combined experience and to highlight unique features of these conditions in the setting of a developing country with a relatively high seroprevalence. A comparison was made with experiences in developed countries. In South Africa, HIV infection is a high risk factor for stroke in young patients less than 46 years. These patients do not exhibit the usual risk factors for stroke found in non-infected patients. Most (>90%) present with ischaemic stroke and (80%), a primary aetiology is usually found and in 20 % HIV vasculopathy, presenting with characteristic clinical and imaging features is thought to be the cause. 2/3 of infarcts are large vessel cortical and 1/3 small vessel sub-cortical infarcts. Intracranial haemorrhage is often a consequence of HIV-related dilated aneurysmal arteriopathy. Dissection is a possible complication of this arteriopathy and is thought to be a more likely cause of SAH than saccular aneurysm formation and rupture. In 40-50% patients, stroke is the first manifestation of HIV infection. Intravenous drug abuse and atherosclerotic strokes are not prominent features. HIV-related cerebrovascular disease in South Africa mirrors that found in most parts of the world. There are however some features that appear to be unique in this setting.


A-258

Interlude: Radiology training in South Africa

10:50

Z. Lockhat; Pretoria/ZA

Academic Radiology in South Africa is dynamic, evolving and exciting. Various facets and institutions are involved in academic training, teaching and continuing medical education. These include the Radiological Society of South Africa (RSSA), The College of Medicine of South Africa (CMSA), the nine academic universities, and the international liaisons that the RSSA has nurtured and developed over many years. The College of Medicine hosts biannual national examinations in Diagnostic Radiology and Imaging, and this is supported by the academic institutional curriculum, which may extend over a period of four or five years. Training and examinations in Radiology is constantly being reviewed and refined with consultations between the RSSA and CMSA, and attention being given to local and international standards. Training and teaching is conducted in many forms, with supervision by Consultant Radiologists and includes didactic lectures, presentations at multidisciplinary interdepartmental meetings, journal review, group and individual tutorials and workshops. Practical training is hands-on with supervision by Consultants in all aspects of Radiology including general radiology and special investigations, mammography and biopsy, ultrasound, CT and PET/CT, MRI and angiography and intervention. Registrars rotate through these subspecialty areas during their training.
Candidates have access to academic libraries, a multitude of e-resources, and digital imaging. The Radiological Society of South Africa plays a fundamental role in continuing medical education and specialty training in South Africa. The RSSA has hosted numerous international speakers at congresses, workshops, webinars, visiting lecture programs. There is ongoing support for private and public sector radiologists and specialists in training in terms of radiological literature, awards and financial support towards fellowships and postgraduate training. Amongst the challenges facing South African Radiology, are the vast spectrum of pathology that is seen in imaging not only due to Tuberculosis and AIDS, but diseases peculiar to the African continent; and perhaps more importantly, the retention of highly skilled and talented Radiologists.


A-259

New concepts in the pathogenesis of cerebral TB

10:55

P. Janse van Rensburg, R. Hewlett; Stellenbosch/ZA

From its inception, the concept of the Rich focus as the ordinary cause for tuberculous meningitis has been controversial. Unfortunately, the concept persists unequivocally in certain in parts of academic literature. Using some of the original images from Arnold Rich’s work, as well as that of the South African physician JN Coetzee’s thesis on tuberculous meningitis, we illustrate why there is significant doubt as to the role of the Rich focus as the cause of basal cisternal tuberculous meningitis. A more likely pathogenetic mechanism based on the original work done by them, as well as on radiological-pathological correlation using MRI, is direct infection of the choroid plexi. The MRI correlate of the Rich focus is proposed to be the combination of granulomata and meningeal enhancement following the course of a convexity sulcus amongst others. Although the Rich focus may co-exist with basal cisternal tuberculous meningitis, these eruptive granulomata have no role in the pathogenesis of the inflammatory reaction localized to the basal cisterns.


A-260

Interlude: South Africa: the country, its people, its diversity and its attractions

11:10

Z. Lockhat; Pretoria/ZA

South Africa (SA) is an extraordinary country, with so many mixed cultures, extreme diversity and a deep rooted history, that is constantly undergoing change not as an event but rather as a process. Herewith, I have tried to present a lighthearted celebration of South Africa, the country, its people, its diversity and its attractions. The Great Outdoors- SA has an abundance of everything nature can bestow, mountains, forests, endless beaches and world heritage sites. With a population of 55 million people, diverse, yet integrated, it is a nation that is growing and healing, and the pride of our nation include people who have had a profound effect on the national and international psyche. South Africa, like many other countries, has its fair share of troubles and tribulations; however, its people have a tenacity and resilience whose stories shine brightly despite all the dark headlines we are sadly famous for. Leave ordinary behind, visit South Africa, and explore and experience the land of the Big Five, the longest wine route in the world, diamonds, gold, whale watching, shark diving, languorous hikes and climbs, the Comrades or the Two Oceans Marathon, the Cape Argus cycling tour.


A-261

Spinal tuberculosis in children

11:15

T. Kilborn; Cape Town/ZA

Children represent a high-risk group for acquiring tuberculosis (TB). Although TB involving the spine occurs in less than 1 % of paediatric patients with TB, it remains a significant cause of morbidity usually as a result of its insidious onset and indolent course that results in delayed presentation. Radiography has disadvantages, the atlanto-occipital and cervicothoracic junctions and posterior elements are difficult to visualise. CT carries a high-radiation burden but is useful prior to surgical reconstruction. MRI is the optimal imaging modality. Spondylodiscitis is the most frequent manifestation of spinal TB. Hallmarks are the involvement of multiple vertebral bodies (usually >3) most commonly thoracic. The resultant kyphotic gibbus is more often responsible for cord compromise than the inflammatory mass. Lack of proteolytic enzymes results in partial or complete disc preservation, commonly with anterior subligamentous, paravertebral or extradural spread, all specific for TB. The addition of a coronal T2 of the mediastinum to show lymphadenopathy and parenchymal disease is useful in supporting the diagnosis, as skin testing is frequently negative. Radiculomyelitis is seen on post-contrast MRI in up to 80 % of cases of meningitis as a result of inferior extension but can also be seen in spondylodiscitis. Intramedullary tuberculomas and tuberculous abscesses are rare, more commonly associated with meningitis than as an isolated finding, their T2 signal correlates with the degree of caseous necrosis; the pattern of contrast enhancement and MRS assist in diagnosis. Accurate, timely radiological diagnosis is crucial in spinal TB to guide management and achieve good clinical outcomes.


A-262

Chronic chest radiographic changes in a cohort of HIV-infected South African children

11:30

R. Pitcher, C. Lombard, M. Cotton, S. Beningfield, H. Zar; Cape Town/ZA

Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) remains the region most affected by HIV. South Africa has the highest global prevalence, estimated at 5.6 million people, including 377,000 children. However, there has been progress in addressing the SSA HIV pandemic. Twenty-two countries, including SA, documented a declining HIV incidence from 2001 to 2009; approximately 105,000 South African children are now on ART, compared to 12,000 in 2005. Respiratory illness is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected children and includes both acute and chronic conditions. The high burden of respiratory illness is reflected in a high prevalence of chest X-ray (CXR) abnormality. The CXR remains the most common imaging modality in the evaluation of respiratory illness in HIV-infected children in low and middle income countries. A better understanding of the clinical and immunological correlates of severe CXR abnormalities is, therefore, important for those practicing in Sub-Saharan Africa. This presentation describes the 5-year findings of a Cape Town based collaborative paediatric HIV-research group and focuses on severe CXR abnormalities in 330 HIV-infected children with limited access to antiretroviral therapy (ARV). CXR reporting methodology will be described. The prevalence of severe radiographic abnormality and the main chest radiographic patterns will be documented. The clinical and immunological correlates of severe CXR abnormality as well as the factors implicated in persistence, will be defined. The impact of ARV’s on the natural history of severe CXR abnormality will be reported. Recommendations will be made with respect to appropriate interventions to prevent severe CXR abnormalities in this context.

...

From RSSA

 

Liquidation of Eyethumed Medical Scheme on 31 December 2012

Friday, 15 February 2013 08:04

Liquidation of Eyethumed Medical Scheme on 31 December 2012

On 31 December 2012, Eyethumed Medical Scheme was liquidated and alternative medical cover was arranged
by the various employer groups, thereby ensuring that no-one defaulted on their membership on the Scheme.

Up to 31 December 2012, Medscheme provided hospital benefit management and administration services, whilst
Primecure and Carecross (including Careworks) were contracted to manage all other benefits for the Scheme.

Payment of claims up to treatment date 31 December 2012:

 
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